Drive in Singapore? Understand Who’s On the Road to Avoid Accidents

Drive in Singapore? Understand Who’s On the Road to Avoid Accidents

June 25, 2014 Car 0 Comments

Singapore Road Traffic at Night

Cars may have a bigger presence on Singapore’s roads, but they’re not alone out there. Car drivers share the crowded roads with Motorbikes, lorries, buses, cyclists and pedestrians. We’re all in this together. 

But, according to the Automobile Association, we all approach the road differently. If you are a car driver, being aware of these differing approaches will play a big part in your ability to avoid accidents.

The Motorcyclist

What You Need To Know About Them

Back, front and to either side. Any empty space around your car is a gap to be filled. Motorcyclists will use every inch of the road to get ahead, because they can. So while you are sitting in slow moving traffic twiddling your thumbs, a biker will be weaving towards the front of the jam.

The point is not to end up going for the same gap at the same time. Double check your mirrors and blind spots and don’t make knee-jerk manoeuvres born of frustration. While there aren’t as many motorbikes on the road (about 1 for every 4 cars on the road), there’s enough of them to ensure they will be on the road with you at any time. So always assume these speedy, nimble vehicles are in your blind spot and double check before changing lanes.

What They Don’t Know About You

What you can and can’t see. This is especially significant given that a large number of motorcyclists have not been behind the wheel of a car. That’s why they may end up riding into your blind spot before swerving in front of you – oblivious to the fact that it’s called a blind spot for good reason. The safest solution? Think ahead, be patient and prepare for the both of you.

The Cyclist

What You Need To Know About Them

High-Vis Spandex offers some protection on a busy road. But bikes are not equipped with mirrors and the act of looking around can cause cyclists to swerve nearer the very obstacle they are hoping to avoid.

Give cyclists plenty of last minute swerve room when overtaking, especiallyon narrow two-way roads where the margin for error becomes miniscule. If in doubt, wait it out. Wait until the road is clearer or the cyclist has opportunity to get further out of your way.

What They Don’t Know About You

That you may misjudge how much room is safe. We’ve all seen cars whizz past cyclists at high speed with mere centimetres to spare. It’s not safe. Cyclists, quite rightly believe that you will allow a decent margin between them and your metal clad exterior. As a car driver, you have the advantage of size and power, so remember that cyclists often have to make sudden manoeuvres to avoid all manner of stuff at the side of the road. Expect the unexpected, and you won’t be unpleasantly surprised!

The Bus or Lorry Driver

What You Need To Know About Them

Buses and lorries need more room than you think. Due to their weight, these lumbering vehicles cannot easily make sudden stops even at low speeds. And in the case of buses, sudden stops are not great for standing passengers, especially the elderly and young children. To keep everyone’s safety in mind, do not nip in front of buses or lorries, don’t race them to beat red lights and avoid turning at narrow junctions side by side. A tight squeeze can quickly become an undesirable sandwich.

What They Don’t Know About You

Think of your car as the motorbike or bicycle to any bigger vehicle. In other words, if you have trouble spotting smaller vehicles, so will a bus or lorry. Tall cabin vehicles command a better view of the road ahead but impair the driver’s ability to see what’s directly in front, coming from behind or even alongside. Exercise caution and anticipate how and when to safely overtake.

The Pedestrian

What You Need To Know About Them

Texting while driving is about as safe as driving with a blindfold. Bottom line, if your eyes are not on the road you are not in control of your car. Pedestrians have also become more prone to inhibiting their ability to stay safe by texting, or even (why??) checking Facebook while crossing a busy road.  Our car recently stopped while a pedestrian crossed a Zebra off the ever busy Bukit Timah Road, completely oblivious to anything but his phone.

Earphones also make it harder to judge where cars are. All this to say, pedestrians can zone out on busy roads just as easily as side roads. They may not be looking out for you, so make sure to be looking out for them.

What They Don’t Know About You

A significant number of pedestrians in Singapore have never driven a car. This matters to you because unless a person has tried to stop a car suddenly, even going 30 mph, he/she will not know how long it takes. It also makes it harder for pedestrians to judge the speed you are going, they may see a safe gap to cross when in reality you are going to close that gap in a matter of seconds. Keep an eye on your speed at all times and always anticipate the road ahead.

Safe Drivers – Rewards Here

At DirectAsia.com we like to reward safe drivers, so we have introduced a popular best price guarantee on car insurance.

Who can qualify?

Safe drivers over 30 with: 

  1. No accidents or demerit points for the last 3 years.
  2. NCD of 30% or higher.
  3. Car that is for private use & commuting to work only.

You may also like to take advantage of our innovative scheme to reward customers who have an in-car camera installed, if you do, we will give you 4% off your car insurance premium.

There’s no doubt that safe driving saves lives. Find out how it can save you money on your car insurance today.

What are your tips for safe driving on Singapore’s roads?



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